Week Eleven: Chapter 7 Putting the 5 practices in a broader context of lesson planning

25 Mar 2014 2:37 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

Week Eleven:  Chapter 7  Putting the 5 practices in a broader context of lesson planning


Read pp 75-85

Then respond to either Option A or Option B


Option A.  

Use the TTLP to plan a lesson.  Record key aspects of your planning using the Lesson Plan Template.  Teach the lesson.


Reflect on the impact of the TTLP and the related Lesson Plan Template on your ability to enact the lesson.


Option B.

Under what circumstances can you imagine engaging in the level of planning suggested?  What advantages can you see in doing so for a subset of lessons that might be particularly pivotal in learning specific concepts.

Comments

  • 26 Mar 2014 11:11 AM | Anonymous member
    I have greatly enjoyed this book but have not had the time to plan as carefully as this book requires. However, every time I have group work and a projected report out, I try to carefully monitor the response in the groups and line them up in a way that the curriculum questions will be covered accurately. My future timing will include greater familiarity with newly implemented curriculum to have greater knowledge of what is being asked and possible responses. I feel as if I am moving away from the nice person at the beginning who used groups and hoped they did the right thing to a more conscious understanding of how to manage group dynamics. IN my teaching this week, I had a group of college students reporting out on how to teach the area of irregular shapes. I used the plan from this book but did not write it down first ( which I think would really help).
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    • 31 Mar 2014 8:41 AM | Anonymous member
      Mary,

      I completely agree with you- I too have enjoyed this book & have learned a great deal from it. It has verified some things I already do & has given me so many ideas for the future. This book would be helpful creating units as you are thinking about the mathematics, the various learners in your classroom, and determining essential questions you might ask. I agree with you regarding writing things down- very helpful for me as well.

      Donna
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  • 30 Mar 2014 8:30 PM | Anonymous member
    The level of planning that is suggested in chapter 7 feels overwhelming to do an a daily basis. Having a goal or focus question for each lesson is my first step in planning. Knowing the mathematics of the lesson, thinking through the task(s) that the students will do, anticipating needed scaffolding/extensions, and knowing the connection to yesterday's lesson and tomorrow's lesson are part of my daily planning when teaching. The chart on pg 81 with the questions are great and would be good to review on a regular basis. I also find that rereading the teacher notes from one year to the next is important. After teaching with a set of materials for several years I might feel like I know the lesson, but inevitably when I go back and reread the teacher notes, I find something useful that I wouldn't have done otherwise. I pay close attention to what students are doing while they are working to make sure I'm learning about their thinking and understanding of the math for that day. Part of my planning includes thinking through the mathematics of the lesson but there are still times when I'm am surprised at a student's approach.
    I think a key aspect mentioned at the end of the chapter is the importance of collaboration. We do planning together on a regular weekly basis which improves our instruction. The discussions about the math and how to implement the lesson are great and help us all be better teachers. During the year I've seen teachers share an idea and then make changes based on the conversation and the ideas from each teacher. In this way, all students benefit from the teachers' joint discussions and planning.
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